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hugh.harries · hugh.harries@gmail.com | Group Owner  - Edit Membership Start a Group | My Groups
CICLY · Lethal Yellowing Disease of Coconut Palm

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Re: C I C L Y Differentiation and classification of phytoplasmas.   Message List  
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Re: C I C L Y Differentiation and classification of phytoplasmas.

Nigel

Thanks for you prompt and detailed answer. If only some others could do likewise . . .

I have taken a couple of your points to start other lines of thought that someone might care to investigate, some day [some hope].

On 06/09/07, Nigel A. Harrison <naha@ufl.edu> wrote:

. . . Precise identification of strains is very helpful of course for accurately determining plant and insect hosts for understanding disease epidemiology.
 
, , ,  two of these assays clearly distinguish the strain associated with CLY in Jamaica, from strains associated with CLY in Florida, Mexico, Belize and Honduras. I choose my words carefully here because there are numerous LY group 16SrIV strains that have been recently described in Jamaica. These newly detected strains have been found in an assortment of understory dicot plant species and insects (Cedusa sp.) and characterized on the basis of their 16S rRNA gene sequence.  So far none of these strains have been shown to occur (infect) in LY-affected coconut.

 


 



 


 
 . . . additional information can ruin a good story without providing any alternative insight into the source of the disease.


 
My thought is that, unless the newly detected strains are completely spontaneous and therefore totally coincidental, there is likely to be some factor(s) that may associate them with CLY.

Is it simply because they are being looked for? By which I mean that they might equally be found in assorted understory plants and insects in another country or in the absence of CLY.

Or do they derive from a "generic" phytoplasma (if there can be such an organism) that is common to a region (or even global)?

If the original CLY "mutated" after passing though Cedusa or Emilia is the incidence of LY greater because the new strain is more virulent or because more than one vector is now involved?

Lastly, for now, could any biotech manipulation techniques be developed and used on phytoplasma carrying plant or insect tissues in vitro to generate these new strains (or other different ones)?

Perhaps these lines of thought are not as fresh as I would like to believe? And there must be others that I haven't come up with.

Hugh Harries

Coconut Time Line




Sat Sep 8, 2007 3:01 pm

"Hugh Harries" <hugh.harries@gmail.com>
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Hello Hugh, Unfortunately, not very much. The rp gene cluster S19-L22-S3, or portions therof, has beeen the subject of considerable investigation because RFLP...
Nigel A. Harrison
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Sep 6, 2007
8:34 pm

Nigel Thanks for you prompt and detailed answer. If only some others could do likewise . . . I have taken a couple of your points to start other lines of...
Hugh Harries
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Sep 8, 2007
3:12 pm
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